Best Comics comic recommendations 2021 of 2021
Best Comics comic recommendations 2021 of 2021
While I’m sure I would have enjoyed  Scarenthood  years ago, the post-kids experience definitely sends this four issue miniseries from Nick Roche and Chris O’Halloran soaring up my favorites. Equal parts the comedy of getting to know other parents at daycare, and the horror of unleashing an eldritch evil underneath their school ,  Scarenthood  is immaculately constructed and one of the most charming comics I’ve read this year. For more, check out my interview with Dan Watters and Aditya Bidikar ! So here’s the premise of  Pelican Bastards by cartoonist Michael Aushenker: These pelicans? They’re absolute f*****n bastards. Recommendation #2: My interview with writer Tate Brombal on all things  Barbalien ! Aminder Dhaliwal’s graphic novel satirization of society’s discriminations and treatment of marginalized communities is an almost impossible blend of scathing, hilarious, and heartfelt. In her Drawn & Quarterly follow-up to 2018’s  Woman World , Dhaliwal imagines a universe full of Cyclopes, where a primary “othering” occurs based on how many eyes an individual has. The satire is incredibly strong – there’s a page in particular about who gets to write minority literature that I haven’t stopped thinking about – but honestly, it’s the structure that blows me away the most.  Cyclopedia Exotica  is almost entirely two-page vignettes, oscillating between the lives of various Cyclops, and the majority of the time it’s set-up, set-up, punchline. There are exceptions that elevate the work, but the bulk of its 225 pages find Dhaliwal trying to land a comic strip gag every two pages, and the success rate is  astonishingly  high for that kind of volume. Easily one of the best graphic novels of the year, and one I expect we’ll see on ‘must read’ lists for a long time to come. My expectations for  After the Rain  were absolutely blown away, as this adaptation of a Nnedi Okorafor short story is an exceptional graphic novel, kicking off the incredibly promising Megascope line of comics curated by John Jennings. As scripter  and  colorist here, Jennings and artist David Brame convert Okorafor’s afrospeculative fiction into a creeping, encroaching,  Swamp Thing  esque horror story about a young woman’s transition from America to her African roots. Brame and Jenning’s art and panel layouts are mind-boggling yet natural, and worth the price of admission alone. For more, check out my interview with Chip Zdarsky ! From DC’s Infinite Frontier Era, I’d add Joker, Nightwing, Titans Academy, and Batman. I think all three of these comics are doing some incredible things! Stan Sakai is the Greg Maddox of comic creators, maintaining his absolute mastery of the Usagi Yojimbo saga longer than anyone could have predicted. Sakai and Usagi continue this incredible history of excellence into 2021 during the ongoing run from BOOM Studios, where Usagi’s stories are fully colored and as essential as ever. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Apart from the explosive conceptual ideas, the queer spin on Commanders in Crisis helps elevate the series into a less familiar pastiche of the well trod genre. At its best, the series reminds me a lot of Morrison’s Action Comics and President Superman. David F. Walker and Marcus Kwame Anderson’s historical graphic novel is an essential dive into the nuance and depth of America’s Black Panther Party. Personally, I had a very limited understanding of what the Black Panthers actually  did,  with my perception of the party shrouded mostly in vague ideas of militancy and violence. Which, as I read this graphic novel, is also exactly the intent of then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, and the government’s cointelpro operations destabilizing and diminishing the party at every turn. ‘The Portrait of Dorian Gray’ looms large in my memory, one of those classics of literature that I simply read at the right point in my most curious voracious consumptions of high-minded college art. A Picture of Everything Else from Vault Comics builds on the foundations of that Oscar Wilde classic, portraying high society art scenes interrupted by paintings that can destroy, and perhaps the literal Devil himself. Matt Fraction, Elsa Charretier, and Matt Hollingsworth’s four issue graphic novella cycle concludes with 2021’s  November IV , bringing all the chronologically disparate pieces fully into focus. You don’t have to say more than “punk rock haunted house” to get my interest, but a creative collaboration between Dan Watters, Caspar Wjingard, Adita Bidikar and team certainly doesn’t hurt. early in the run, Home Sick Pilots is a brilliant blend of teenage angst, found family, and supernatural legacy begging to welcome you inside. For more, check out my interview with Kat Leyh !
I’m not surprised that I like SWORD by Al Ewing, Valerio Schiti, Marte Gracia and their X-Men line collaborators, but I am surprised how rapidly the focus on Marvel’s mutant space program launched into my absolute favorite comics. The first issue of  SWORD  packs a punch like the finest moments of House of X / Powers of X , and Ewing is firing in 2021 in a way he never has before . Not to mention,  SWORD  pulls off the remarkable feat of launching straight into a linewide Marvel crossover event ( and  fitting into the grand scheme of Hickman’s X-Men, and honestly, I couldn’t be more impressed. This list is more of a carry over and I haven’t added a lot of comics that normally would be on my list but these were ones that were on my mind right now. Written by academy-award winning John Ridley, the Black Label prestige series The Other History of the DC Universe  has been hotly anticipated since it was announced literal years ago. Miraculously, the work has lived up to the hype, with Ridley and Guiseppe Camuncoli teaming up to reframe DC’s enormous shared history through the lens of minority heroes like Black Lightning and Mal Duncan. Check out Comic Book Herald’s review of the Best New Graphic Novel ! Juni Ba’s TKO Studios graphic novel is an artistic delight, navigating the sweet spot between West African folklore,  Samurai Jack , and  Hellboy . Few works balance the delicate underutilized reference points of Ba’s Senegalese heritage with this much thrilling action, adventure, and anthropomorphic warthogs and foxes in dire need of comeuppance. The cartooning and vibrant splahses and hand-written sound effects bring to mind the thrill of Daniel Warren Johnson, but in his most significant writing to date, Ba proves an incredibly thoughtful storyteller, full of heart and subtlety. Below you’ll find all the best comics released primarily in 2021. See a graphic novel or series you love missing from the list? Let us know in the comments! While historically ‘best of’ lists are best suited at year’s end, the reality is that waiting until then actually leaves some doubt throughout the year itself what is considered great  as it’s happening . With that in mind, throughout 2021, I’ll be regularly updating Comic Book Herald’s best comics of 2021 guide, so that the work can function as a check-in for your next series to read, and by year’s end, a summary of everything we recommend. When I asked CBH writers to contribute to 2020’s year-end best of list, I was surprised when Sara Century added an entry for  TMNT . For whatever reason, the turtles have remained far off my radar throughout most of my comic obsessive years, always on the backburner of something I’d  like  to dig into if only I had the time. This despite the fact that growing up, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles probably trailed only X-Men for childhood fandom favorites. Honestly, at a certain point, I’m borderline embarrassed with how many Vault Comics new series launches I want to include on year-end best ofs. I’ve been called a ‘Marvel Shill’ , but I have this weird internal resistance to promoting literally everything Vault does as potential year-end best of quality. I’m my own free-thinking pound of beefcake, ya know? Check out Comic Book Herald’s “Best New Graphic Novel” full review ! It would be helpful to include the publisher along with those titles, please and thank you. And yet, Vault’s internal quality filter is  insanely  good, and the reality is the publisher simply knows how to combine some of the best creators in comics with excellent concepts, and in the case of  I Walk With Monsters , subtle, twisting horror. I already knew I liked Paul Cornell’s writing an awful lot , but Sally Cantirino’s art that completely blows me away, and sells me on yet  another  Vault book on the best of 2021. For more, check out my interview with Juni Ba ! Comic Book Herald is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a qualifying affiliate commission. Writer Stephanie Phillips is one of my favorite up-and-coming creators in comics, and her latest from Aftershock Comics with artist Tony Shasteen is a great example why.  Nuclear Family  takes the alt-history nuclear fallout premise, and adds substantial layers of unexpected intrigue and mystery, consistently taking the story of post-“the bomb” Milwaukee to new and surprising places. Plus, the marriage of 1950s into the 60s science fiction with satirical historical back matter gives  Nuclear Family  a unique voice and position in comics this year. Getting into Canto from David M. Booher, Drew Zucker, Deron Bennett & IDW Publishing is one of my favorite moves of the entire year. The sophisticated all-ages fairy tale follows the clockwork knight, Canto, as he attempts to free his people from the magical enslavement of The Shrouded Man. The irony that Canto and the clockwork knights have had their hearts replaced with ticking clocks is not lost, as Canto’s bravery and sheer fortitude in the face of the impossible is delightfully charming. Canto draws inspiration from “The Wizard of Oz,” and Dante’s “Inferno,” but in modern comics terms, it’s very much in the conversation with Bone, Amulet, and Klaus . Well, I’m glad Sara made the recommendation because the latest era of  TMNT  – “Turtles Reborn” by writer/artist Sophie Campbell – is absolutely  wonderful . Even with only passing familiarity to the “City at War” event that proceeds this era, I was able to dive in and fully enjoy the new status quo for the turtle-verse. It’s an incredibly thoughtful, rich set-up for story, with amazing character work. Campbell’s writing and interiors are a perfect fit for this franchise, and hope to continue reading this era of  TMNT  as long as it lasts! In what might by the least accessible work of writer Jonathan Hickman to date, we find instead one of the most rewarding, rereadable sci-fi explorations I’ve read in comics.  Decorum  is the hard science fiction world-building fans of  Powers of X  have been waiting for the return of in X-Men comics. The eight issue comics’ willful abrasions make the text nearly unknowable until the story is complete in full, apart from the escalating realization that artist Mike Huddleston is operating on another level. Watching Huddleston interrogate and explode the basic tenets of sequential storytelling feels like what I imagine readers experienced with the likes of Bill Sienkiewicz in the 1980s. comic recommendations 2021 Hi Dave. First off just wanted to say thank you for maintaining this site! I lost track of comics for a stretch but got back into them a few years back and your guides have allowed me to find and read some truly excellent runs. Which brings me to my question. I’m trying to find a good point to stop with Marvel as I’m running out of shelf space. My collection run starts with Avengers Disassembled so I should have stopped with Secret Wars but there was too much good writing going on. Currently I’m reading the Hickman xmen books, Coates Cap and Black Panther. Ewing’s Hulk, and Chip’s Daredevil. I don’t want to collection to stop on a weak ending. Do you have any thoughts on how best to tie this all up? Thanks!!! N.K. Jemisin and Jamal Campbell’s excellent addition to the long history of DC’s Green Lantern mythos feels mildly like cheating because it’s a 12 issue series that has taken long enough to come out that it’s been on the CBH best of lists since 2019! Nonetheless, the story of Jo Mullein is excellent enough that it warrants a recommendation as long as the work’s in production, and I hope for comics’ sake, this isn’t the last we’ll see of Jemisin and Campbell in the medium. Comic Book Herald’s reading orders and guides are also made possible by , and generous reader donations. I’ve never been a boxing fan, and honestly, that’s a big part of the appeal of learning more about Muhammad Ali through this experimental work of comics and photojournalism. The graphic novel from Titan Comics combines the comics work of Jean-David Mornaz and Rafael Ortiz, and merges it with rare photos by Abbas of Ali’s fight against George Foreman in Zaire, 1974, aka “The Rumble in the Jungle.” The end result is a unique work of varied histories, culminating in one of the biggest sporting events of the 70s. I’m not sure how additive this book would be for an Ali or boxing fan – or for an Abbas fan for that matter – but as someone with limited knowledge of either, I found it completely fascinating. Even if  Wake  wasn’t gorgeously illustrated by Hugo Martinez, in a remarkable showcase of artistic styles to imbue historical excavation with wonder, it would still be an essential document of Dr. Rebecca Hall’s years-long journey to uncover the role of women in slave revolts throughout American history. Dr. Hall’s commitment to uncovering these ignored, undocumented, and regularly erased stories is remarkable, as is the seamless and imaginatively rendered graphic novel. While certain privilege can help many of us feel like slavery is in the long dead past, works like Wake  work to achieve a message similar to Octavia E. Butler’s  Kindred ;  a regular reminder that we are, all of us, living in the wake of slavery. Kat Leyh is a singular creator, coming fresh off 2020’s hit  Snagdragon   and churning out a more adult focus on three mermaids who go out for a night on the town and get stuck with legs. It’s a wonderfully produced graphic novel, full of humor, seriously diverse character work, and heartwarming friendship. Ice Cream Man has been on some version of my best of lists since 2018, and from 2020 on the title of Comic Book Herald’s favorite ongoing series is Ice Cream Man’s to lose. W. Maxwell Prince, Martin Morazzo, and Chris O’Halloran are simply the most inventive creative team in comics on an issue-by-issue basis. I’m blown away by the confidence, focus and creative synergy in The Department of Truth, the Image Comics series from James Tynion IV, Martin Simmonds, Aditya Bidikar and editor Steve Foxe. The series tackles the nature of conspiracy theories, in a world where belief in various real-world conspiracies transfers to manifesting those false ideas into reality. So flat-earth rallies lead to helicopter rides to the true edge of the world, and false flag school shootings lead to one of the most heartbreaking and chilling comics I’ve read. Best Comics comic recommendations 2021 of 2021Best Comics comic recommendations 2021 of 2021 The Other History of the DC Universe is my choice for best of 2021, so far. Take Netflix’s “Queen’s Gambit” and replace chess with bare-knuckle boxing, and the setting with 18th century London, and you’ve got yourself the framing for Legendary Comics’  Championess.  Kelly Zekas, Tarun Shanker, and Amanda Perez Puentes craft one of the most obviously silver screen ready “based on a true story” narratives I’ve read this year, the story of Elizabeth Wilkinson making a name for herself as a boxer. The success of Megascope continues throughout 2021 with  Black Star,  the tense sci-fi thriller from Eric Anthony Glover and Arielle Jovellanos. I get sent a fair amount of comics these days, and often I’ll pick one up and start reading to see if it’s one I’ll want to pursue later. That was my intention with Black Star , but instead, I simply read the breathless, beautiful tale from cover to cover. Gripping is an understatement. Glover and Jovellanos craft a silver screen ready saga following scientist Harper North’s trek across an increasingly uninhabitable landscape, in a race against the clock to escape a crashed planet… and perhaps something else. James Harren is an incredible artistic talent, making a formal writer/artist debut in  Ultramega . The “ Invincible for Kaiju” first issue is one of the best opening chapters to a new series I’ve read in a few years, and promises an amazing visual spectacle and world full of mysterious giant-sized powerups. Elsewhere, Haha is very much a spiritual spinoff, with writer W. Maxwell Prince shifting his unique brand of surreal philosophy from cosmic Ice Cream Men to all manner of costumed clowns. The darkness of the Ice Cream Man universe certainly follows, although Prince and his new-artist-per-issue collaborators play the stories a bit straighter, less reliant on a conceptual hook, or interconnected supernatural flavor of the day. Dave is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Comic Book Herald, and also the Boss of assigning himself fancy titles. He's a long-time comic book fan, and can be seen most evenings in Batman pajama pants. Contact Dave @comicbookherald on Twitter or via email at . For more, check out my interview with W. Maxwell Prince ! The adapted history is fascinating in and of itself, but it’s Zekas and Shanker’s personality and humor written into the main character that drive the graphic novel. Elizabeth is a wonderful character, and the addition of a mixed race heritage adds layers of complexity and relevance to her rise to earn respect in her chosen sport. When I interviewed Steve Orlando about Kill A Man mid 2020 , he mentioned an upcoming creator-owned work riffing on DC’s Crisis on Infinite Earths, and a multiverse of superheroes, and I immediately wanted to do nothing but read that comic and ask him questions about it. Lo and behold, the work is Commanders in Crisis, and it has lived up to my high expectations with a Morrisonian spin on a multiversal gathering of Presidents as Earths around them are eradicated due to mysterious forces. To keep conspiracy from overtaking truth, there’s The Department of Truth, one part Men in Black, one part Planetary. Creating a platform to explore the insidious nature of conspiracy in modern culture is one thing, but managing to make it horrific, entertaining, mysterious, and engaging? That’s some good comics. Ram V’s one of the most exciting creators in comics, and this Boom Studios collaboration with Filipe Andrade has all the makings of a possible classic right from its first issue. Fans of Neil Gaiman’s  Sandman  and  American Gods  may be particularly interested, but there’s much more going on here than a creative unit playing with mythology. A delightful blend of absurdist comedy,  Pelican Bastards  has been a highlight of my exploration of webcomics and digital platforms this year . I didn’t know I needed pelicans committing crimes and being the biggest jerks, all mixed in with a police procedural in the spirit of  Naked Gun , but Aushenker has shown me I absolutely do. The Other History of the DCU is slept on and that very much angers me. Killadelphia is in the same category as the Other History of the DCU as books that sadly get no recognition Catwoman by Ram V and Blanco should have been on lists last year, excellent craft in that book. Department of Truth is one of the best ongoings in comics Monstress is the best ongoing in comics Strange Adventures Far Sector Who would want to live forever? Stillwater by Chip Zdarksy, Ramon Perez, and Mike Spicer is far from the first time anyone’s asked the question, but it’s one of the most memorable answers in recent memory, distilling the prospect down to a single small town, and their mysterious never-ending, never-changing lives. Zdarsky’s post Sex Criminals comics career is off to a fascinating start, with the strong opening of a run on Stillwater, plus the continued intrigue of his classic-in-the-making work on Daredevil . Zeb Wells, Carmen Carnero, Stephen Segovia, and team’s X-Men line book of mutantkind’s “Bad Batch” continues to compete for best of the Hickman-era X-Verse. Nothing at Marvel combines the same level of humor, punch, and – somehow – integral relevance to massive shared superhero continuity! Check out Comic Book Herald’s “Best New Graphic Novel” full review ! Rory McConville, Joe Palmer, Chris O’Halloran and Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou team up for an incredible effective, impossible to put down tale of two brother hitmen trying to wrap up one last job before retirement. I gave this graphic novel a peek just to see if it would be up my alley, and an hour later I was wrapping up the entire affair. The worlds of organized crime families will ring true for fans of everything from  Fargo  to  Boondock Saints , but it’s McConville and Palmer’s characterization throughout that sells this is a lot more than an “another” crime drama. The cover for the graphic novel is by Declan Shalvey, which honestly makes a lot of sense considering 2020’s  Bog Bodies is one of the most recent comparisons that stood out to me as well. The full Comic Book Herald “ Best New Graphic Novel” review ! Filed Under: Best of Lists , Tagged With: best of 2021 For more, check out my conversation with John Jennings on  After the Rain. For more, check out my interview with Nick Roche ! The history of the Panthers is not easy, and Walker and Anderson do a great job painting a full picture, warts and all, while highlighting the underdiscussed social good, the irrefutably complicit role of law enforcement, and extremely relevant  points the party was founded on. As Walker writes in the afterword, “It is perfectly fine if, after reading this book, you’re not sure how you feel about the Panthers or you have mixed emotions.” best comic books for 4 year olds